The 2018 Eurovision That Almost Was: Semifinal One

It’s always fun to look back at the national final season and imagine how things could have been different in Lisbon. Then again, in the case of Semifinal One, things wouldn’t have been that different: 9 of the 19 countries involved went with an internal selection.

We’re also including the three Big 6 countries that voted in Semifinal One so that we can once again whinge about the BBC.

Belarus: Gunesh – “I Won’t Cry

Are you a movie producer from the 1980s looking for a perky pop song to use in a montage scene in your romcom about mistaken identities? Jump in your time machine and set a course for Minsk! Gunesh performed wearing a trench coat dress that we hoped would lead to a spectacular costume change. Our hopes were dashed by the last high note she almost landed.

Bulgaria: Internal selection. Not applicable.

Lithuania: Jurgis Brūzga – “4love

There was something weirdly hokey about the staging of Jurgis Brūzga’s “4Love.” Apparently, he and his team decided to stage their mid-’00s dance jam like a number from a flop musical. It’s a little bit too smiley and a little bit too manic to work. Or maybe we’re just disappointed that this wasn’t the return of 4Fun.

Albania: Redon Makashi – “Ekziston

“Ekziston” is a lovely little ballad, but Redon’s performance lacked the fireworks Eugent Bushpepa brought to “Mall.”

Czech Republic: Debbi – “High on Love

“High On Love” reminds us a bit of “Stones,” Zibbz’ song for Switzerland. It’s a decent pop banger that takes a generic Eurovision thematic trope and gives it some zing. Ultimately, though, there’s no doubt Czech Republic made the right choice.

Belgium: Internal selection. Not applicable.

Iceland: Dagur Sigurðsson – “Í stormi”

The story of this year’s Söngvakeppnin boiled down to this: two singers selling two staid ballads that were well below their talent. We would have preferred “Í stormi” over “Our Choice,” though, because it sounds like it came from this millennium.

Azerbaijan: Internal selection. Not applicable.

Israel: Jonathan Mergui – Song internally selected.

Jonathan Mergui was the runner up to Netta on Rising Star, which was used to select Israel’s Eurovision performer. He probably would have been a solid representative of his country. And we probably would have been heading to Nicosia in 2019.

Estonia: Stig Rästa – “Home”

We are not as big fans of Stig as a lot of other Eurovision diehards seem to be, but we thought “Home” was Stig’s best contribution to Eesti Laul to date.

Switzerland: Alejandro Reyes – “Compass

“Compass” is a low-key pop number in the Puth-Mendes realm. We  preferred it to “Stones,” although we wouldn’t have expected it to go over much better in Lisbon.

Finland: Saara Aalto – “Domino

“Monsters” is a lead single off an album. “Domino” is the fifth single off that album, the one that comes out while the artist is already back in the studio working their follow-up.

Austria: Internal selection. Not applicable.

Ireland: Internal selection. Not applicable.

Armenia: Nemra – “I’m a Liar”

The Stig Rästa of Armenia performs a fluffly little retro ballad with a couple bits of non-gimmick gimmickry, including a random traditional folk bit at the end. It is goofy fun.

Cyprus: Internal selection. Not applicable.

Croatia: Internal selection. Not applicable.

Greece: Internal selection. Not applicable.

Macedonia: Internal selection. Not applicable.

United Kingdom: No 2nd place announced. Not applicable.

One of the more annoying things about BBC is that they never release the voting tallies for You Decide. We expect SuRie ran away with the competition, but we would have loved to seen how Asanda and Jaz Ellington finished.

Spain: Aitana – “Arde

“Arde” is a smoldering ballad and while Aitana sings it well, it lacked the spark that Amaia & Alfred brought to “Tu canción.”

Portugal: Catarina Miranda – “Para Sorrir Eu Não Preciso de Nada

“Para Sorrir Eu Não Preciso de Nada” reminds us of 1970s-era AM radio. It’s okay, but Catarina seemed to really struggle with it.  We can’t argue that Portugal made the wrong choice, their ultimate fate in May notwithstanding.