The Semi-Final and Final Line-Ups

The way Eurovision works is the countries who finished in the top 10 during last year’s final get a bye to this year’s final. Also, the U.K., France, Germany and Spain automatically qualify. The other countries who have entered songs will compete in a semi-final, and the top 10 finishers move on to the final.

Here are the semi-finalists, in order of performance on May 10:

  1. Bulgaria – Elitsa Todorova & Stoyan Yankoulov: “Water”
  2. Israel – Teapacks: “Push The Button”
  3. Cyprus – Evridiki: “Comme Ci, Comme Ça”
  4. Belarus – Koldun: “Work Your Magic”
  5. Iceland – Eiríkur Hauksson: “Valentine Lost”
  6. Georgia – Sopho: “Visionary Dream”
  7. Montenegro – Stevan Faddy: “Ajde Kroči”
  8. Switzerland – DJ Bobo: “Vampires Are Alive”
  9. Moldova – Natalia Barbu: “Fight”
  10. The Netherlands – Edsilia Rombley: “On Top Of The World”
  11. Albania – Frederik Ndoci: “Hear My Plea”
  12. Denmark – DQ: “Drama Queen”
  13. Croatia – Dragonfly w/ Dado Topić: “Vjerujem U Ljubav”
  14. Poland – The Jet Set: “Time To Party”
  15. Serbia – Marija Šerifović: “Molitva”
  16. Czech Republic – Kabát: “Malá Dáma”
  17. Portugal – Sabrina: “Dança Comigo”
  18. FYR Macedonia – Karolina: “Mojot Svet”
  19. Norway – Guri Schanke: “Ven A Bailar Conmigo”
  20. Malta – Olivia Lewis: “Vertigo”
  21. Andorra – Anonymous: “Salvem El Món”
  22. Hungary – Magdi Rúzsa: “Unsubstantial Blues”
  23. ESTONIA!!!!! – Gerli Padar: “Partners In Crime”
  24. Belgium – The KMG’s: “LovePower”
  25. Slovenia – Alenka Gotar: “Cvet Z Juga”
  26. Turkey – Kenan Doğulu – “Shake It Up Shekerim”
  27. Austria – Eric Papilaya: “Get A Life – Get Alive”
  28. Latvia – Bonaparti.lv: “Questa Notte”

Now, the finalists, listed in order of appearance on May 12. The numerical gaps will be filled in with the top semi-finalists:

  1. Bosnia & Herzegovina – Maria Šestić: “Rijeka Bez Imena”
  2. Spain – D’Nash: “I Love You Mi Vida”
  3. Ireland – Dervish: “They Can’t Stop The Spring”
  4. Finland – Hanna Pakarinen: “Leave Me Alone”
  5. Lithuania – 4Fun: “Love Or Leave”
  6. Greece – Sarbel: “Yassou Maria”
  7. Sweden – The Ark: “The Worrying Kind”
  8. France – Les Fatals Picards: “L’amour À La Française”
  9. Russia – Serebro: “Song #1”
  10. Germany – Roger Cicero: “Frauen Regier’n Die Welt”
  11. Ukraine – Verka Serduchka: “Dancing Lasha Tumbai”
  12. United Kingdom – Scooch: “Flying The Flag (For You)”
  13. Romania – Todomondo: “Liubi, Liubi, I Love You”
  14. Armenia – Hayko: “Anytime You Need”

Eurovision 2007

Jeez, has it already been a year since Lordi was crowned king of Europop? Well, Eurovision 2007 is next week, and we’ll be previewing it over the next few days. Unfortunately, we won’t be able to watch the Semi-Final this year because Chris has class that day and Jen has to work. But we will be watching the main event together because Jen is in town for it this year, too! It’s going to be the greatest Eurovision ever! Except for the part where we hear the songs from France and Ireland. Those parts are never good.

Eurovision 2006 Superlatives

We started doing our Superlatives posts in earnest back in 2011 (although, randomly, we did a Semifinals superlatives post in 2009). As we look back at our 10 years of Eurovision blogging, we decided it would be fun to write up Superlatives posts for 2006-2010. Plus it gives us an excuse to watch the Eurovision Finals from 2006-2010 yet again.

  • Least persuasive call to give a little: Switzerland (six4one – “If We All Give a Little”)
  • Best Razr scooter product placement: Moldova (Arsenium feat. Natalia Gordienko – “Loca”)
  • Least inspirational gospel breakdown: Israel (Eddie Butler – “Together We Are One”)
  • Most tonal shifts… literally: Latvia (Vocal Group Cosmos – “I Hear Your Heart”)
  • Best display of spoils that Vikings looted from Ireland: Norway (Christine Guldbrandsen – “Alvedansen”)
  • Most compelling reason to put mustard on hot dogs: Spain (Las Ketchup – “Un Blodymary”)
  • Most emphatic response to the question “Do you schlager?”: Malta (Fabrizio Faniello – “I Do”)
  • Most in need of a Nudie suit: Germany (Texas Lightning – “No No Never”)
  • Most likely to force Chubby Checker to reevaluate his place in music history: Denmark (Sidsel Ben Semmane – “Twist of Love”)
  • Most practical ballerina storage solution: Russia (Dima Bilan – “Never Let You Go”)
  • Most blatant rip-off of the previous winning entry: Macedonia (Elena Risteska – “Ninanajna” )
  • Best manifestation of Plato’s Theory of Eurovision Song Forms: Romania (Mihai Trăistariu – “Tornerò”)
  • Most unexpected tribute to Norway’s 1976 Eurovision entry: Hari Mata Hari from Bosnia and Herzegovina (Hari Mata Hari – “Lejla”)
  • The LT United Award for most self-aware entry: Lithuania (LT United – “We Are the Winners”)
  • Best hip hop from the streets of Knightsbridge: United Kingdom (Daz Sampson – “Teenage Life”)
  • Most desperate ode to co-dependence: Greece (Anna Vissi – “Everything”)
  • Most… just the most: Finland (Lordi – “Hard Rock Hallelujah”)
  • Best Shakira impression: Ukraine (Tina Karol – “Show Me Your Love”)
  • Worst throwback to when it was just a Song Contest: France (Virginie Pouchain – “Il était temps”)
  • Jauntiest Balkan entry: Croatia (Severina – “Moja štikla”)
  • Song whose premise is most easily disproved: Ireland (Brian Kennedy – “Every Song Is a Cry for Love”)
  • Best mash-up of ABBA and Wicked: Sweden (Carola – “Invincible”)
  • Best throwback to Studio 54: Turkey (Sibel Tüzün – “Süper Star”)
  • Best re-purposing of office furniture: Armenia (André – “Without Your Love”)
  • Most likely to get there, popular: Finland

Originally published 23 September 2015

Finland Wins!

Finland wins Eurovision far and away with 292 points! They get to end the show with an encore of “Hard Rock Hallelujah.” I wonder what this bodes for the future of the competition…

Here are the full points results from the Eurovision site: PDF

Who Are the Winners of Eurovision?

Who are? Who are?

Let’s find out. These are the top results from each country. I’m skipping the bottom results because I can’t type that fast. You’ll find out who are the bottom feeders later. (Suffice to say, there’s a lot of booing when Greece gets low points or when Lithuania gets high points.)

Slovakia-
8: Finland
10: Croatia
12: Bosnia & Herzegovina

Andorra-
8: Sweden
10: Finland
12: Spain

Romania-
8: Russia
10: Greece
12: Moldova

Denmark-
8: Bosnia & Herzegovina
10: Sweden
12: Finland

Latvia-
8: Finland
10: Lithuania
12: Russia

Portugal-
8: Sweden
10: Romania
12: Ukraine

Sweden-
8: Denmark
10: Bosnia & Herzegovina
12: Finland

Finland-
8: Lithuania
10: Bosnia & Herzegovina
12: Russia

Belgium-
8: Finland
10: Greece
12: Armenia

Croatia-
8: Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
10: Finland
12: Bosnia & Herzegovina

Serbia & Montenegro-
8: Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
10: Croatia
12: Bosnia & Herzegovina
(No song, but they can still vote!)

Norway-
8: Bosnia & Herzegovina
10: Sweden
12: Finland

ESTONIA!!!!-
8: Lithuania
10: Russia
12: Finland
(Low points for Latvia – weird)

Ireland-
8: United Kingdom
10: Finland
12: Lithuania

Malta-
8: Greece
10: Romania
12: Switzerland

Lithuania-
8: Latvia
10: Finland
12: Russia
(The crowd is booing the Lithuania announcer)

Cyprus-
8: Russia
10: Romania
12: Greece

Netherlands-
8: Bosnia & Herzegovina
10: Armenia
12: Turkey

Switzerland-
8: Finland
10: Turkey
12: Bosnia & Herzegovina

Ukraine-
8: Armenia
10: Bosnia & Herzegovina
12: Russia

Russia-
8. Finland
10. Ukraine
12. Armenia

Poland-
8. Lithuania
10. Russia
12. Finland
(The crowd has stopped booing Lithuania.)

United Kingdom-
8. Ireland
10. Lithuania
12. Finland

Romania-
8. Greece
10. Ukraine
12. Russia

France-
8. Finland
10. Armenia
12. Turkey

Belarus-
8. Armenia
10. Ukraine
12. Russia

Germany-
8. Greece
10. Finland
12. Turkey

Spain-
8. Armenia
10. Finland
12. Romania

Moldova-
8. Ukraine
10. Russia
12. Romania

Bosnia & Herzegovina-
8. Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
10. Turkey
12. Croatia

Iceland-
8. Denmark
10. Lithuania
12. Finland

Monaco-
8. Lativa
10. Ireland
12. Bosnia & Herzegovina

Israel-
8. Armenia
10. Romania
12. Russia

Albania-
8. Greece
10. Sweden
12. Bosnia & Herzegovina
(Malta finally gets a point, so no nil votes this year.)

Greece-
8. Russia
10. Armenia
12. Finland
(Says the Greek announcer, “Those beautiful, sweet-looking creatures from Finland.”)

Bulgaria-
8. Armenia
10. Russia
12. Greece

Macedonia-
8. Russia
10. Croatia
12. Bosnia & Herzegovina

Turkey-
8. Ukraine
10. Armenia
12. Bosnia & Herzegovina

How the Voting Works

Once Svante Stockselius, the EBU overseer, confirms that the voting went well, Maria & Sakis explain the scoring. The top ten vote getters from each voting country receive points based on the voting results. A country can get 1 (for 10th place in voting), 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 or 12 points. There are no points for countries outside of the top 10 in each country. It’s a bit confusing, but you’ll get the hang of it as we go along. There are 38 countries to go through, so this will take a while.

The Voting Is Closed

Now it’s time for Maria & Sakis to vamp a bit while the votes are counted. Sakis performed a song during the semis on Thursday. Tonight, we get a celebration of 4,000 years of Greek song.

This gives me chance to sift through the Eurovision website, where I learn that Serbia and Montenegro withdrew from the competition. Because they pulled out late, they still have to pay the participation fee.

The BBC has a story about what happened: “Serbia-Montenegro in pop song row.” Montenegro votes tomorrow on whether or not it will declare its independence from Serbia.

Meanwhile…

While we’re waiting for the votes to come in and to be counted, we get another performance by last year’s winner, Helena. It’s a slightly better song than the one she won with. It’s exactly three minutes, too.

The Vote

Now it’s time to vote. Countries are not allowed to vote for their own entries, which means there’s frequently a lot of bloc voting. You can call or send a text message to vote, just like on American Idol.

Legendary Greek singer (and former Eurovision competitor) Nana Mouskouri came out to turn over the hourglass that opens the 10-minute voting window. (It’s a huge heart-shaped hourglass with the Greek flag on it, mounted on a stand.) After turning it over, the hourglass turned back rightside up, so they had to quickly get it going again. I guess you get an extra two seconds to vote.